Men’s Crochet Hat Pattern: A Basic

mens crochet hat pattern

Whipped this bad boy up this weekend because I wanted a basic men’s hat pattern. You know, for those projects where you want a neutral base. A few years ago, I made this men’s hat and wanted to create something that was sized a bit larger and without the textured band.

Finished hat will fit an adult male: 21.5 inches wide by 7.75 inches tall.

Men’s Crochet Hat Pattern


  • 120 yards worsted weight yarn. I used Vanna’s Choice in tan
  • Size H (5.0mm) crochet hook

**Important: Check gauge and either use thicker yarn or a larger crochet hook. After Round 2, hat should measure 3 inches in diameter**

Chain 3, join with sl st to form ring.

Round 1: Ch 2 (counts as first DC. Work Ch 2 at the beginning of every round in place of first DC). Work 14 more DC into ring. (15 stitches)

Round 2: 2 DC into each stitch around (30 stitches). Measure gauge. Hat should measure 3 inches.

mens crochet hat pattern gauge

Round 3: 1 DC into first stitch. 2 DC into second stitch. Continue pattern of *1 DC, 2 DC* around. (45 stitches)

Round 4: 1 DC into each of next 4 stitches. 2 DC into fifth stitch. Continue pattern of *1 DC into next 4 stitches, 2 DC into next stitch* around. (54 stitches)

Round 5: 1 DC into each stitch. (54 stitches)

Round 6: 1 DC into each of next 8 stitches. 2 DC into fifth stitch. Continue pattern of *1 DC into next 8 stitches, 2 DC into next stitch* around. (63 stitches)

Rounds 7 – 13: 1 DC into each stitch. (63 stitches)

Round 14: SC into each stitch. (63 stitches). Fasten off. Weave in end.

crochet hat patterncrochet hat

crochet hats pattern
crochet hat for men

The Fourth, Final & Finished Afghan

The last time I shared a progress picture, the afghan I was working on was 12 x 11 squares. The colors were blending nicely, but it wasn’t very big. If you’re going to hand-crochet a blanket, then you commit to make a blanket.

I decided to extend the pattern and the afghan turned out to be 12 x 14 squares. I worked until the yarn ran out. Now we’ve got ourselves a blanket! I added 8 rows of a granny-square border, working the same three double crochet cluster into each opening to mirror the look of a granny square.

The inspiration was, of course, Attic 24’s Granny Patchwork afghan.

crochet granny square blanket

Lucy of Attic 24 uses a different method for making granny squares and it’s one I’ve adopted myself. (Once you make 168 squares, you learn to love something). Lucy prefers to not work the chain between 3 DC clusters and only uses 1 chain instead of 2 for the corner stitches. Cutting out or reducing the number of chains makes a tighter square without sacrificing the base elements of the traditional crocheted granny. I really liked her modification.

This afghan was the fourth and final piece in a series of blankets I’ve been working on for the last 4-5 years. I told myself I wouldn’t get sentimental, but it’s hard not to! When I was a senior in college (2011), someone contacted me through my Etsy shop and asked me to crochet a blanket for her daughter as she started college.

The plan was one afghan a year for four years.

#1: Crochet Hexagon Blanket

Crochet Hexagon Blanket

#2: Ripple Crochet Blanket

Crochet Ripple Blanket

#3: Picot Granny Square


and this is #4.

crocheted granny squares

Of the four, my favorite was the third one–the Picot granny square. It also took the longest amount of time (by far), but the design is so unique I loved making it. Textured, small and large squares and the colors–just perfection.

Over the years, the woman who contracted the blankets and I became friends. We exchanged Christmas gifts and emails, thoughts on the blankets as they came together. A random note to share vacation plans and life updates. She’s seen me move four times, congratulate me on two new jobs and always been a part of my free time.

It was odd packing up the last of the blankets and writing the final note a few weeks ago. I’ve never met this woman or her daughter who graduated from Yale, yet somehow we’ve been part of each other’s lives. Her daughter joked she’ll have to consider grad school to keep the blankets coming!

It’s the end of a JJCrochet era. Now the question becomes… what to work on next.

Crochet vs. Knitting Differences

If you’ve found yourself inexplicably drawn to the yarn section of craft stores, you may be looking to learn the differences between crocheting vs. knitting.

crochet vs knitting

Some crocheters also knit and knitters have been known to crochet. There’s a benefit to being able to do both, though some crafters prefer to just do one. I’ve been crocheting for 18 years and knitting for 14. Over the years, I’ve found benefits for each.

Knitting and crocheting are different, though are the same at their core: You’re creating something from yarn and a needle or hooks by following a pattern. Learning both will allow you to choose which is better for your particular project whether you’re making a dog sweater or a tea cozy.

The table below outlines basic differences I’ve found between knitting and crocheting. You may have found the opposite, this is what I’ve experienced over the years. Review to learn if you’d make a coordinated crocheter or knowledgeable knitter.

Crochet vs. Knitting: A Comparison
ToolsOne Hook & YarnTwo Needles & Yarn
Basic Stitch MotionLoops & KnotsLoops
Active Stitches at Any Time1All
Number of Basic Stitches102
Fabric TextureCoarse & Thick Smooth & Flat
Construction MethodSpacial: Turns or Irregular ShapesLinear:Limited by Loops on Needles
Correcting MistakesEasy: Rip Out StitchesMedium: Unknit without Dropping Stitches
Flexibility in PatternsHigh: Easy to Free-FormMedium: Harder to Free-Form
Average Project TimeMedium: Stitches are Bigger & Projects Work up FasterHigh
Yarn NeededMore: Crocheting Takes 1/3 more Yarn Less
Availability of PatternsMediumHigh
Best Used ForWearable Accessories (Hats or Scarves) & AfghansSweaters & Wearables
Ease of LearningDepends on you!Depends on you!

Leave a comment of what you think. What have you found to be better for your crafting: knitting or crocheting?

The Fourth & Final Afghan

If you’ve been keeping tabs, I finished the third of my afghans–the crochet granny square flower–last spring. Since then, I’ve been busy working on the fourth and final installment of the afghans.

It’s with great pride I present the Solid Squared Afghan!


This guy differs from its three sibling since its squares are solid colors, not comprised of four to six different colors. The squares themselves are working up quicker (no time joining colors) and can I just tell you how infinitely excited I am to have 75% LESS ends to weave in.

My fellow crocheters, can I get an ‘amen’?!

This afghan was designed to be 12 x 12 squares, yet I found it too small. Each square measures just under four inches, forming an afghan 48 by 48 inches. I figured why stop there? I had enough yarn and plan to keep working until it runs out.

Project Details:

  • Size 3.5mm (E 4) crochet hook
  • Over 15 different colors of Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmireno
  • Five rows of granny squares, using the join-as-you-go method

This is also a great project to use up yarn scraps. Pick complimenting threads or random colors and join, join, join until you have yourself an afghan. It becomes almost mindless work–great while watching episodes of Arrested Develpment or Mad Men or nothing. :) Enjoy!

A Trip to Asia: Vietnam, Thailand & a Little Shanghai

My last post was about making last-minute Christmas presents. How embarrassing! What’s even more dismal is that I’ve not had much time to crochet in the past weeks. I’ve been traveling and planning the trip hasn’t left much free time. I promise, there will be new projects soon!


For this vacation, I met up with friends who are living in Shanghai and we took a two week trip to Vietnam (Hoi An and Saigon/Ho Chi Mihn City) and Thailand (Koh Lanta and Phi-Phi Island). It was magical! It was my first time in Southeast Asia. I probably knew only 10% of all I saw, tasted and experienced before I went on this trip. I even got to spend 3 days in Shanghai which was fantastic as well.






  • Scootering around the Thai and Vietnamese countrysides on motorbikes
  • Snorkeling with sharks in Phi Phi
  • Eating like kings for about $4/meal (favorites were Bahn Mi, dumplings, Korean BBQ, baracuda tar-tar, pho, multiple curries, Thai pancakes and fresh mango smoothies)
  • A Thai cooking class where I learned that unlike American cuisine that keeps most flavors separate, Thai food seeks to feature all four flavors in one dish (sweet, salty, sour and savory)
  • Surviving nine flights, one of which was on Air Asia
  • Watching multiple sun sets over the Adaman Sea/Indian Ocean
  • Touring the My Son ruins in Vietnam
  • Crawling through the Cu Chi tunnels the Viet Cong used to hide in during the Vietnam War
  • Dining in the dark – the entire meal is served in total blackness and you have to use your sense of smell and taste to identify your food. All servers are blind
  • Ringing in the Chinese New Year on a rooftop bar
  • Traditional Thai massages (painful!)
  • Beating Escape rooms (twice!)
  • Releasing lanterns on the beaches of Thailand and floating rives of Hoi An
  • Sipping caipirinas on the beach



shanghai skyline


It was such a nice break from the freezing temperatures we’ve been having in Pittsburgh (went from 0 degrees to 95 degrees Farenheit!) and the responsibilities of life. Who doesn’t love vacation? Can’t wait to go back!


Crochet Christmas Gifts & Last Minute Projects

It’s nearly Christmas. Months ago, when the sun was still shining and tan lines were your largest concern, you had grand plans of hand-crocheting presents for everyone on your list. Was it ambitious? Sure, but you’d have a plan and plenty of time to stitch.


And yet, here we are.

We’re days away from the big day and you need projects–completed projects. We’ve all been there and there’s still hope! Here are some of my favorite crocheted Christmas gifts.

They’re quick, they’re customizable and they’re easy for beginners. Most will take an hour or less to work up. So grab your hooks, go through your stash and cross off that Christmas gift list!

For the Friend

For the Coworker

For the Sister-In-Law

For the New Mom

For Anyone