Tag Archives: crocheting vs. knitting

Knitting vs. Crocheting: Which is Better? Which is Harder?

Knitting vs. Crocheting

Knitting and crocheting are similar, yet different. Both crafts use yarn to make items, but knitting is done with two knitting needles and the stitches are loops. Crocheting, on the other hand, is done with just one crochet hook and the stitches resemble small knots. The resulting projects look different, too.

Knitting can be easier to learn because only two stitches are used: the knit stitch and purl stitch. It’s a very logical craft – knitters move stitches from one needle to the other, then back again. The loops remain on the needles which makes for very organized projects. Stitches look like straight lines or little V’s.

Crochet stitches build from each other and range from very short and small (chain stitch) to very tall and twisty (triple crochet). In between are other stitches, the most common being the single crochet and double crochet stitches. Stitches are bumpier and more textured.

Crocheting (left) vs. Knitting (right)

Comparing Crocheting (left) vs. Knitting (right)

Knitting is great for items that need delicate stitches such as soft sweaters or fluffy cowls. Crocheting is perfect for when bulkier stitches are needed – hats, scarves or dishtowels.

Knitting is your craft if you: 

  • Have patience – Knitting projects can take more time and be more detailed (the stitches are also smaller!)
  • Want to save money (but only to buy expensive yarn) – crochet projects take a third more yarn
  • Prefer logical projects and directions
  • Want to enjoy an extensive library of patterns – knitting patterns can be more popular and more readily available than crochet patterns
  • What you’ll need: yarn + knitting needles (size 11 for beginners)

Crochet is your craft if: 

  • Quick projects excite you (bigger stitches = projects work up faster)
  • You aren’t afraid of making mistakes – it’s easier to rip out work or fix a mixed stitch
  • Your mind works spatially – you like going up, down and around or over
  • You’re creative – crochet patterns can be scarcer to find and you might have to forge your own path
  • What you’ll need: “normal sized” yarn + a crochet needle (size H for beginners)

I learned to crochet when I was 8 so it’s my first love and I’m obviously biased, but knitting is a close second! If you’re adventurous, I’d recommend trying both crafts and seeing what you like. I’ve taught both to friends and it seems to be an individual basis of what is easier or harder – some people hate the structured stitches of knitting, while others find crocheting too cumbersome and need boundaries.

If I had to recommend just one, I’d recommend knitting since it tends to be easier for people to pick up quickly.

Either way, you can’t go wrong! Which one have you tried?

For 8 reasons why crochet is better than knitting, read here.

Top 8 Reasons Why Crocheting is Better Than Knitting

Top 8 reasons Why Crocheting is Better than KnittingIt’s time to hang up the gloves. The question of which is better–crocheting or knitting– has been discussed since the first sheep’s wool was spun into yarn.

Knitters hold their needles high as they offer delicate stitches and sweaters that took weeks to knit, while crocheters fight back with the functionality of their knotted work.

As someone who has been crocheting since she was 8 and knitting since she was 13, I want to end this argument for good.

Crocheting is Better Than Knitting.  (Don’t tell me you couldn’t see that coming… I have a crochet  blog.)

Here are 8 reasons why I believe crocheting is better than knitting:

1.  Crocheting takes 30% more yarn than knitting.  While some might view this as a disadvantage, I view it as a positive.  Any compulsive crafter would have to agree.  The bigger dent you make in your overwhelming yarn stash at one time, the better.

2.  Crocheting uses one hook instead of two needles.  Why phenangle two things when it’s easier to hold just one?

3.  Crocheting is faster.  Knitters see patterns for 5 1/2-hour crochet afghans and cringe.  They dream about the day they could make something that fast.  For crocheters, making an afghan in two evening sittings isn’t anything new.

4. Crocheting is easier to learn.  I’ll admit this one is subjective… but it’s factual and true.

5.  You have more freedom when crocheting.  Crocheters use one hook with one loop of yarn on it.  Knitters, on the other hand, have perfectly aligned loops sitting obediently on their needles.  Where’s the freedom? When crocheting, if you suddenly want to go over the side, go for it.  Back the way you came?  Sure – not a problem.  Want to join something together?  Just fold and stitch along the top.  Ladies, it doesn’t get more free than that.

6. You can easily make  a crochet flower and other accessories.  I put crochet flowers on pretty much every hat I crochet because I think they’re adorable.  (In fact, I love making crochet flowers so much that I created a Video Tutorial on how to crochet a flower.)  Patterns for knitted flowers involve no less than 12 steps and lots of sewing together.  All that work takes the joy out of flowers.

7. There are less crochet patterns than knitting patterns.  Also might seem like a downside, but the thrill of the hunt makes this a plus for crocheting.  Finding a good crochet patternis like finding GOLD.   Hundreds of books have been written about knitting, but good crochet patterns are harder to trace down and more rewarding when you find them.

8.  And finally, the most compelling part of the case:  Crocheting creates a heavier, stretchier fabric.  This heavier fabric is useful when making:

  • Hats
  • Scarves
  • Afghans
  • Baby Blankets
  • Scrubbies & Dishcloths
  • Dishtowels
  • Bags
  • Purses
  • Cowls
  • Socks/ Slippers
  • Rugs
  • Ponchos (are these still in?)
  • Cozies (iPod, Coffee Cup)
  • Pouches (Laptop, Cell Phone)
  • Flowers
  • Mittens or  Gloves
  • Amigurumi (little crocheted animals)
  • Even Dog Sweaters are better crocheted.

Pretty much the only thing people would rather knit than crochet is a sweater.  So for projects that are a sweater, pull out the knitting needles.  For everything else, grab a hook because crocheting’s where it’s at.

And so, I think you will find that crocheting, as whole, is better than knitting. What’s your preference?  Are you a one hook or a two needle crafter?

For an additional comparison between knitting and crocheting, read here: http://www.jjcrochet.com/blog/knitting-vs-crocheting/.