Category Archives: Crochet

Chunk Knit & Crochet Hats with Pom-Poms!

If you’re like me, you’ve probably seen the chunky knits and pom-pom hats that are E-V-E-R-Y-W-H-E-R-E. J.Crew, Burbery, L.L. Bean, American Eagle, Loft, etc. etc. As a hooker, I’m obsessed. They’re the perfect blend of warm texture and a little playful fun!

Of course, there’s no integrity in purchasing one from a big-box store, so I decided to knit my own.

While running errands on Wednesday, I found myself in Michael’s (I swear I don’t know how that always happens!). I started perusing the yarn aisle even though, you know, I don’t need anything. The deals were too good, the skeins were too cozy.

I let my guard down and envisioned a weekend of chunky cables and pom-poms. So I bought 22 skeins of yarn and 16 pom-poms. Oh the shame!

(Fun note: the fuzzy pom-poms are actually keychains that are attached to the metal with a small elastic band. A little prying apart of the attachments and I had a simple way to sew onto the hats using the elastic loop.) 

I’ve worked up 4 hats yesterday and this morning:  two cable knit black hats, one cream and another crocheted maroon one. The black and cream ones are based off a pattern from Premknits, the Braided Cable Beanie Pattern ($4.99).

I hate (hate!) knitting in the round (the tubes always twist and turn on me) so I modified the pattern so I could knit on my ever-trusty straights. After following most of the pattern for two hats, I decided to scale it down to only 5 cables instead of 6 and I like how that looks. Less yarn, less time, less bulk.

The crocheted maroon hat was a pattern I made up as I went along and didn’t write down. I can if there’s interest! It takes some time since you have to go back and work slip stitches onto some stitches after you finish to give those 5 rounds their lines of texture.

I love how these knit pom-pom hats are turning out! It’s fun to experiment and see how each one is a little different.

I plan on gifting a few as Christmas gifts  since they work up quickly and everyone loves a good hat. Might also be on the hunt for some new pom-poms, but TBD, it’s going to take me some time to use up the other dozen…

Crochet Star Garland for Christmas

After eating Thanksgiving left-overs for dinner, it’s time to decorate my apartment for Christmas! Carols are playing, crochet hooks are out, my balsam candle is lit and a glass of merlot is poured.

I found this great star pattern from Persia Lou and knew it’d be the perfect accompaniment to the minimalistic Christmas decorations on my bar cart. The stars were festive, they were crocheted, they were PERFECT.

crochet garland bar cart

I followed Alexis’ instructions exactly, minus the blocking since there’s no time for that when you’re too excited. If you look closely, you’ll spot my crochet hook on the bar cart – I told you there was no time for formalities – I wanted to see how this looked hung up!

Because I skipped the blocking, the stars do look more like flowers with rounded instead of pointy petals so I might make some DIY blocking liquid (equal parts glue + water), but TBD on that.

I made 5 stars using cream Vanna’s choice worsted weight yarn and joined them together with a chain of burlap string I had left over from another craft project. For the burlap cord, I used a K hook (same as for the stars) and did 13 chains between each star, joining as I went.

Materials

  • 30 yards Vanna’s Choice yarn
  • Size K crochet hook
  • 5 yards Burlap cord – I used some from Ms. Sparkle & Co.

crochet star garland

I love how it turned out. So festive! So fun! If you’re looking for a quick, easy crochet project to make your house look festive this Christmas, I highly recommend this pattern by Alexis at Persia Lou. https://persialou.com/2015/12/crochet-star-ornaments-free-pattern.html

I could see the crochet stars being great as tree ornaments, light switch hangers or laid down on a counter top – really anywhere you need some extra cheer!

Easy Men’s Crochet Hat Pattern for Beginners

Looking for an easy, uncomplicated men’s crochet hat pattern? Something that’s good for a beginner? Search no more!

I’ve written out the pattern and avoided crochet abbreviations so you know exactly what to do. Sized for a man, but will also fit women’s heads, too.

Easy Men's Crochet Hat Pattern

This simple men’s crochet hat pattern is easy. No frills, no weird stitches, just a tried and true shape that’s guaranteed to fit the guy in your life. Make one for your brother, you hubby, your friend or mailman. Side note: I have curly, thick hair which means I need a bigger hat. This hat fit my head so don’t let the “men’s” part of the title scare you away – this would be just as good for a women as a guy! 

All you need to know is how to make a double crochet, single crochet, chain stitch and slip stitch.

Grab your hooks and let’s go!

Easy Men's Crochet Hat Pattern

Men’s Crochet Hat Pattern

Skill Level: Easy

Materials:

Size: Men, Adult, Women

Directions

Chain 3, slip stitch into first chain to form loop.

Round 1: Chain 2 (counts as first double crochet now and throughout). Work 12 more double crochet into ring. Slip stitch into top of chain 2 to join into a circle. (13 double crochet total).

Round 2: Work 2 double crochet into each stitch around. Join with slip stitch to top of chain 2. (26 double crochet total).

<<Stop and measure work to check your gauge! Laid flat, circle should measure just under 3.25 inches across. If smaller or larger, adjust your hook size or yarn.>>

Crochet Gauge

Round 3: Work 2 double crochet into first stitch, 1 dc into the next stitch. Repeat pattern of *2 1 2 1 double crochets* around. Join with slip stitch to top of chain 2. (39 double crochet total).

Round 4: Work 2 double crochet into first stitch. 1 dc into each of the next 7 stitches. Repeat pattern of *2 double crochet…. 7 double crochets into next 7 stitches…. 2 double crochet into the next stitch* around. It’s ok if you don’t end perfectly. Join with slip stitch to top of chain 2. (46 or 47 double crochet).

Rounds 5 – 13: Double crochet into each stitch around. (46 or 47 double crochet).

Round 14: Chain 1 (counts as first single crochet). Single crochet in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of chain 1 to join. Fasten off. (46 or 47 double crochet).

Crochet Men's Hat Close Up

You did it! This pattern is basic and simple enough that you can customize to your liking. You can add a stripe in of a different color for Round 11. Or maybe you’d like to make a fold-up brim? Simple repeat Round 5 a couple more times and your hat will be longer so you can fold up the ends.

I’d love to hear if you make your very own men’s hat for someone. Leave a comment below!

Related Posts: 

Close Up Men's Crochet Hat

 

Knitting vs. Crocheting: Which is Better? Which is Harder?

Knitting vs. Crocheting

Knitting and crocheting are similar, yet different. Both crafts use yarn to make items, but knitting is done with two knitting needles and the stitches are loops. Crocheting, on the other hand, is done with just one crochet hook and the stitches resemble small knots. The resulting projects look different, too.

Knitting can be easier to learn because only two stitches are used: the knit stitch and purl stitch. It’s a very logical craft – knitters move stitches from one needle to the other, then back again. The loops remain on the needles which makes for very organized projects. Stitches look like straight lines or little V’s.

Crochet stitches build from each other and range from very short and small (chain stitch) to very tall and twisty (triple crochet). In between are other stitches, the most common being the single crochet and double crochet stitches. Stitches are bumpier and more textured.

Crocheting (left) vs. Knitting (right)

Comparing Crocheting (left) vs. Knitting (right)

Knitting is great for items that need delicate stitches such as soft sweaters or fluffy cowls. Crocheting is perfect for when bulkier stitches are needed – hats, scarves or dishtowels.

Knitting is your craft if you: 

  • Have patience – Knitting projects can take more time and be more detailed (the stitches are also smaller!)
  • Want to save money (but only to buy expensive yarn) – crochet projects take a third more yarn
  • Prefer logical projects and directions
  • Want to enjoy an extensive library of patterns – knitting patterns can be more popular and more readily available than crochet patterns
  • What you’ll need: yarn + knitting needles (size 11 for beginners)

Crochet is your craft if: 

  • Quick projects excite you (bigger stitches = projects work up faster)
  • You aren’t afraid of making mistakes – it’s easier to rip out work or fix a mixed stitch
  • Your mind works spatially – you like going up, down and around or over
  • You’re creative – crochet patterns can be scarcer to find and you might have to forge your own path
  • What you’ll need: “normal sized” yarn + a crochet needle (size H for beginners)

I learned to crochet when I was 8 so it’s my first love and I’m obviously biased, but knitting is a close second! If you’re adventurous, I’d recommend trying both crafts and seeing what you like. I’ve taught both to friends and it seems to be an individual basis of what is easier or harder – some people hate the structured stitches of knitting, while others find crocheting too cumbersome and need boundaries.

If I had to recommend just one, I’d recommend knitting since it tends to be easier for people to pick up quickly.

Either way, you can’t go wrong! Which one have you tried?

For 8 reasons why crochet is better than knitting, read here.

Men’s Crochet Hat Pattern: A Basic

mens crochet hat pattern

Whipped this bad boy up this weekend because I wanted a basic men’s hat pattern. You know, for those projects where you want a neutral base. A few years ago, I made this men’s hat and wanted to create something that was sized a bit larger and without the textured band.

Finished hat will fit an adult male: 21.5 inches wide by 7.75 inches tall.




Men’s Crochet Hat Pattern

Materials: 

  • 120 yards worsted weight yarn. I used Vanna’s Choice in tan
  • Size H (5.0mm) crochet hook

**Important: Check gauge and either use thicker yarn or a larger crochet hook. After Round 2, hat should measure 3 inches in diameter**

Chain 3, join with sl st to form ring.

Round 1: Ch 2 (counts as first DC. Work Ch 2 at the beginning of every round in place of first DC). Work 14 more DC into ring. (15 stitches)

Round 2: 2 DC into each stitch around (30 stitches). Measure gauge. Hat should measure 3 inches.

mens crochet hat pattern gauge

Round 3: 1 DC into first stitch. 2 DC into second stitch. Continue pattern of *1 DC, 2 DC* around. (45 stitches)

Round 4: 1 DC into each of next 4 stitches. 2 DC into fifth stitch. Continue pattern of *1 DC into next 4 stitches, 2 DC into next stitch* around. (54 stitches)

Round 5: 1 DC into each stitch. (54 stitches)

Round 6: 1 DC into each of next 8 stitches. 2 DC into next stitch. Continue pattern of *1 DC into next 8 stitches, 2 DC into next stitch* around. (63 stitches)

Rounds 7 – 13: 1 DC into each stitch. (63 stitches)

Round 14: SC into each stitch. (63 stitches). Fasten off. Weave in end.

crochet hat patterncrochet hat

crochet hats pattern
crochet hat for men




The Fourth, Final & Finished Afghan

The last time I shared a progress picture, the afghan I was working on was 12 x 11 squares. The colors were blending nicely, but it wasn’t very big. If you’re going to hand-crochet a blanket, then you commit to make a blanket.

I decided to extend the pattern and the afghan turned out to be 12 x 14 squares. I worked until the yarn ran out. Now we’ve got ourselves a blanket! I added 8 rows of a granny-square border, working the same three double crochet cluster into each opening to mirror the look of a granny square.

The inspiration was, of course, Attic 24’s Granny Patchwork afghan.

crochet granny square blanket

Lucy of Attic 24 uses a different method for making granny squares and it’s one I’ve adopted myself. (Once you make 168 squares, you learn to love something). Lucy prefers to not work the chain between 3 DC clusters and only uses 1 chain instead of 2 for the corner stitches. Cutting out or reducing the number of chains makes a tighter square without sacrificing the base elements of the traditional crocheted granny. I really liked her modification.

This afghan was the fourth and final piece in a series of blankets I’ve been working on for the last 4-5 years. I told myself I wouldn’t get sentimental, but it’s hard not to! When I was a senior in college (2011), someone contacted me through my Etsy shop and asked me to crochet a blanket for her daughter as she started college.

The plan was one afghan a year for four years.

#1: Crochet Hexagon Blanket

Crochet Hexagon Blanket

#2: Ripple Crochet Blanket

Crochet Ripple Blanket

#3: Picot Granny Square

rainbowafghan

and this is #4.

crocheted granny squares

Of the four, my favorite was the third one–the Picot granny square. It also took the longest amount of time (by far), but the design is so unique I loved making it. Textured, small and large squares and the colors–just perfection.

Over the years, the woman who contracted the blankets and I became friends. We exchanged Christmas gifts and emails, thoughts on the blankets as they came together. A random note to share vacation plans and life updates. She’s seen me move four times, congratulate me on two new jobs and always been a part of my free time.

It was odd packing up the last of the blankets and writing the final note a few weeks ago. I’ve never met this woman or her daughter who graduated from Yale, yet somehow we’ve been part of each other’s lives. Her daughter joked she’ll have to consider grad school to keep the blankets coming!

It’s the end of a JJCrochet era. Now the question becomes… what to work on next.